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Cell. 2016 Jan 14;164(1-2):208-218. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.11.038.

Prefrontal Parvalbumin Neurons in Control of Attention.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Retzius väg 8, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, W080 Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; Department of Bioengineering, W080 Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, W080 Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
3
Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Retzius väg 8, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: marie.carlen@ki.se.

Abstract

While signatures of attention have been extensively studied in sensory systems, the neural sources and computations responsible for top-down control of attention are largely unknown. Using chronic recordings in mice, we found that fast-spiking parvalbumin (FS-PV) interneurons in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) uniformly show increased and sustained firing during goal-driven attentional processing, correlating to the level of attention. Elevated activity of FS-PV neurons on the timescale of seconds predicted successful execution of behavior. Successful allocation of attention was characterized by strong synchronization of FS-PV neurons, increased gamma oscillations, and phase locking of pyramidal firing. Phase-locked pyramidal neurons showed gamma-phase-dependent rate modulation during successful attentional processing. Optogenetic silencing of FS-PV neurons deteriorated attentional processing, while optogenetic synchronization of FS-PV neurons at gamma frequencies had pro-cognitive effects and improved goal-directed behavior. FS-PV neurons thus act as a functional unit coordinating the activity in the local mPFC circuit during goal-driven attentional processing.

PMID:
26771492
PMCID:
PMC4715187
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2015.11.038
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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