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Amino Acids. 2016 Apr;48(4):907-14. doi: 10.1007/s00726-015-2168-x. Epub 2016 Jan 14.

Alterations of amino acid metabolism in osteoarthritis: its implications for nutrition and health.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410078, Hunan, China.
2
Laboratory of Animal Nutrition and Health and Key Laboratory of Agro-Ecology, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha, 410125, Hunan, China.
3
Department of Animal Science, Texas A&M University, 2471 TAMU, College Station, TX, 77843-2471, USA.
4
Department of Orthopaedics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410078, Hunan, China. lgh9640@sina.cn.

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common form of arthritis in humans. It has long been regarded as a non-inflammatory disease, but a degree of inflammation is now recognized as being a vital inducer of subpopulation of OA. Besides inflammation, the establishment and development of OA are associated with alterations in metabolism and profiles of amino acids (AA), including glutamate- and arginine-family AA as well as their related metabolites (e.g., creatinine, hydroxyproline, γ-aminobutyrate, dimethylarginines and homoarginine). Functional AA (e.g., glutamine, arginine, glutamate, glycine, proline, and tryptophan) have various benefits (i.e., anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation) in treatment of inflammation-associated diseases, including OA. Thus, these AA have potential as immunomodulatory nutrients for patients with inflammation-induced OA.

KEYWORDS:

Arginine; Glutamate; Glutamine; Inflammation; Osteoarthritis

PMID:
26767374
DOI:
10.1007/s00726-015-2168-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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