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Pediatr Obes. 2016 Dec;11(6):491-499. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12092. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

Mediterranean dietary pattern in pregnant women and offspring risk of overweight and abdominal obesity in early childhood: the INMA birth cohort study.

Author information

1
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain.
2
Nutrition and Mental Health Group, Universitat Rovira I Virgili (URV), Reus, Spain.
3
Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Palma (IdISPa), Hospital Universitari Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
4
CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Madrid, Spain.
5
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
6
Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain.
7
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
8
Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Alicante, Spain.
9
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastián, Spain.
10
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus University Medical Centre-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
11
Facultad de Psicología, Universidad del País Vasco-Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea (UPV-EHU), Bizkaia, Spain.
12
Hospital San Agustín, SESPA, Asturias, Spain.
13
Universidad de Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.
14
FISABIO - Universitat Jaume I - Universitat de València Epidemiology and Environmental Health Joint Research Unit, Valencia, Spain.
15
Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques-Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Animal models have suggested that maternal diet quality may reduce offspring obesity risk regardless of maternal body weight; however, evidence from human studies is scarce.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to evaluate associations between adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD) during pregnancy and childhood overweight and abdominal obesity risk at 4 years of age.

METHODS:

We analysed 1827 mother-child pairs from the Spanish 'Infancia y Medio Ambiente' cohort study, recruited between 2003 and 2008. Diet was assessed during pregnancy using a food frequency questionnaire and MD adherence by the relative Mediterranean diet score (rMED). Overweight (including obesity) was defined as an age-specific and sex-specific body mass index ≥85th percentile (World Health Organization referent), and abdominal obesity as a waist circumference (WC) >90th percentile. Multivariate adjusted linear and logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between pregnancy rMED and offspring overweight and abdominal obesity.

RESULT:

There was no association between rMED and body mass index z-score, whereas there was a significant association between higher adherence to MD and lower WC (β of high vs. low rMED: -0.62 cm; 95% confidence interval: -1.10, -0.14 cm, P for trend = 0.009).

CONCLUSION:

Pregnancy adherence to the MD was not associated with childhood overweight risk, but it was associated with lower WC, a marker of abdominal obesity.

KEYWORDS:

Abdominal obesity; Mediterranean diet; childhood obesity; pregnancy

PMID:
26763767
DOI:
10.1111/ijpo.12092
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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