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Indian J Gastroenterol. 2015 Nov;34(6):426-30. doi: 10.1007/s12664-015-0596-x. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

Malrotation of midgut in adults, an unsuspected and neglected condition--An analysis of 64 consensus confirmed cases.

Author information

1
Deccan College of Medical Sciences, DMRL X Road, Santosh Nagar, Kanchan Bagh, Hyderabad, 500 058, India. grprasad22@gmail.com.
2
Deccan College of Medical Sciences, DMRL X Road, Santosh Nagar, Kanchan Bagh, Hyderabad, 500 058, India.
3
Kamineni Institute of Medical Sciences, Central Bank Colony, L B Nagar, Hyderabad, 500 074, India.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Malrotation of midgut is considered to be a condition of childhood. This study evaluated malrotation in adults with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP).

METHODS:

Sixty-four consensus-confirmed cases of intestinal malrotation were reviewed. The diagnosis was based on radiological criteria, and the consensus was arrived at by at least three of the five authors in any individual case.

RESULTS:

Abnormal duodenojejunal junction (DJJ) was a consensus finding in 64 cases referred for RAP. Most were in their fourth decade of life, and 12 were beyond 60 years. Besides RAP, intolerance to food was the next common symptom. Acute intestinal obstruction was seen in 16. Forty-two of 64 patients consented for surgery. Ladd's procedure was the commonest. All patients who underwent surgery were symptom free except for two, of which, one had liver cyst and the other had hernia. Of those who refused surgery (22), all had continued symptoms and 10 patients took alternative therapies. On follow up of initially unwilling patients (for surgery) with abnormal DJJ, only eight consented for surgery; three underwent open Ladd's procedure, and one had laparoscopic Ladd's done.

CONCLUSION:

Malrotation is not uncommon as a cause of RAP in adults.

KEYWORDS:

Duodenojejunal junction; Intestinal obstruction; Ladd’s procedure; Malrotation of midgut; Recurrent abdominal pain; Volvulus

PMID:
26759264
DOI:
10.1007/s12664-015-0596-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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