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Epidemiol Infect. 2016 Jul;144(9):2011-7. doi: 10.1017/S0950268815003313. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

Effectiveness of a programme to reduce the burden of catheter-related bloodstream infections in a tertiary hospital.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine,Alicante University General Hospital,Alicante,Spain.
2
Department of Microbiology,Alicante University General Hospital,Alicante,Spain.
3
Infection Disease Unit,Alicante University General Hospital,Alicante,Spain.
4
Department of Community Nursing,Preventive Medicine and Public Health and History of Science,Alicante University,Carretera de San Vicente del Raspeig,Alicante,Spain.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR BSI) reduction programme and healthcare workers' compliance with recommendations. A 3-year surveillance programme of CR BSIs in all hospital settings was implemented. As part of the programme, there was a direct observation of insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters (CVCs) to determine performance. A total of 38 education courses were held over the study period and feedback reports with the results of surveillance and recommendations were delivered to healthcare workers every 6 months. A total of 6722 short-term CVCs were inserted in 4982 patients for 58 763 catheter-days. Improvements of compliance with hand hygiene was verified at the insertion (87·1-100%, P < 0·001) and maintenance (51·1-72·1%, P = 0·029) of CVCs; and the use of chlorhexidine for skin disinfection was implemented at insertion (35·7-65·4%, P < 0·001) and maintenance (33·3-45·9%, P < 0·197) of CVCs. There were 266 CR BSI incidents recorded with an annual incidence density of 5·75/1000 catheter-days in the first year, 4·38 in the second year [rate ratio (RR) 0·76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·57-1·01] and 3·46 in the third year (RR 0·60, 95% CI 0·44-0·81). The education programme clearly improved compliance with recommendations for CVC handling, and was effective in reducing the burden of CR BSIs.

KEYWORDS:

Catheter-related bloodstream infection; central venous catheter; prevention; programme evaluation

PMID:
26758404
DOI:
10.1017/S0950268815003313
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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