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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Apr;23(8):7828-39. doi: 10.1007/s11356-015-5943-z. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

Land use and soil type determine the presence of the pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei in tropical rivers.

Author information

1
Géosciences Environnement Toulouse (GET), UMR 5563, (IRD, CNRS, UPS), Université de Toulouse, UPS (OMP), CNRS, Toulouse, France. olivier.ribolzi@ird.fr.
2
iEES-Paris (IRD-UPMC-CNRS-INRA-UDD-UPEC), Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), case 23, 4 place Jussieu, Paris cedex, 75252, France.
3
Lao-Oxford-Mahosot Hospital-Wellcome Trust Research Unit, Microbiology Laboratory, Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, Lao People's Democratic Republic.
4
Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
5
Géosciences Environnement Toulouse (GET), UMR 5563, (IRD, CNRS, UPS), Université de Toulouse, UPS (OMP), CNRS, Toulouse, France.
6
Institute of Ecology and Environmental Science-Paris, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), Vientiane, Lao People's Democratic Republic.
7
Department of Agricultural Land Management (DALaM), P.O. Box 4199, Ban Nogviengkham, Xaythany District, Vientiane, Lao People's Democratic Republic.

Abstract

Burkholderia pseudomallei is the bacterium that causes melioidosis in humans. While B. pseudomallei is known to be endemic in South East Asia (SEA), the occurrence of the disease in other parts of the tropics points towards a potentially large global distribution. We investigated the environmental factors that influence the presence (and absence) of B. pseudomallei in a tropical watershed in SEA. Our main objective was to determine whether there is a link between the presence of the organism in the hydrographic network and the upstream soil and land-use type. The presence of B. pseudomallei was determined using a specific quantitative real-time PCR assay following enrichment culture. Land use, soil, geomorphology, and environmental data were then analyzed using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) to compare the B. pseudomallei positive and negative sites. Soil type in the surrounding catchment and turbidity had a strong positive influence on the presence (acrisols and luvisols) or absence (ferralsols) of B. pseudomallei. Given the strong apparent links between soil characteristics, water turbidity, and the presence/absence of B. pseudomallei, actions to raise public awareness about factors increasing the risk of exposure should be undertaken in order to reduce the incidence of melioidosis in regions of endemicity.

KEYWORDS:

Acrisols; Ferralsols; Geographical information system (GIS); Melioidosis; Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA); South East Asia; Turbidity of river water; Watershed

PMID:
26758304
PMCID:
PMC4846699
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-015-5943-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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