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Br J Cancer. 2016 Jan 12;114(1):81-7. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2015.431.

Employment and social benefits up to 10 years after breast cancer diagnosis: a population-based study.

Author information

1
Division of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Coronel Institute of Occupational Health, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation (IKNL), Utrecht, The Netherlands.
4
CoRPS- Centre of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases, Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Tilburg University, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Surgical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little is known about employment outcomes after breast cancer (BC) beyond the first years after treatment.

METHODS:

Employment outcomes were compared with a general population comparison group (N=91 593) up to 10 years after BC for 26 120 patients, diagnosed before age 55 between 2000-2005, with income and social benefits data from Statistics Netherlands. Treatment effects were studied in 14 916 patients, with information on BC recurrences and new cancer events.

RESULTS:

BC survivors experienced higher risk of losing paid employment (Hazard Ratio (HR): 1.6, 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) 1.4-1.8) or any work-related event up to 5-7 years (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.3-1.6) and of receiving disability benefits up to 10 years after diagnosis (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.6-2.5), with higher risks for younger patients. Axillary lymph node dissection increased risk of disability benefits (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.4-1.7) or losing paid employment (HR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2-1.5) during the first 5 years of follow-up. Risk of disability benefits was increased among patients receiving mastectomy and radiotherapy (HR 1.2; 95% CI 1.1-1.3) and after chemotherapy (HR 1.7; 95% CI 1.5-1.9) during the first 5 years after diagnosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

BC treatment at least partly explains the increased risk of adverse employment outcomes up to 10 years after BC.

PMID:
26757424
PMCID:
PMC4716544
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2015.431
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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