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Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2016 Nov 15;88(6):E155-E163. doi: 10.1002/ccd.26397. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

Everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffolds versus second generation drug-eluting stents for percutaneous treatment of chronic total coronary occlusions: Technical and procedural outcomes from the GHOST-CTO registry.

Author information

1
Cardiovascular Department, Ferrarotto Hospital, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
2
Excellence through Newest Advances (ETNA) Foundation, Catania, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We aimed at comparing the acute performance of bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) and second-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) for the treatment of chronic total occlusions (CTO).

BACKGROUND:

There is a lack of knowledge regarding the use of BRS in CTO.

METHODS:

Key outcomes of interest were technical and procedural success. Technical success was defined as successful stent delivery and implantation, postprocedural residual diameter stenosis <30% within the treated segment, and restoration of thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) grade 3 flow. Procedural success was defined as technical success with no in-hospital major adverse cardiac events (MACE).

RESULTS:

Between May 2013 and May 2014, 32 patients underwent CTO percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with the Absorb BRS (Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA) and were compared with a historical control group of 54 patients who had undergone CTO PCI with second-generation DES. Baseline characteristics were similar between the BRS and DES groups, with the exception of a larger mean reference vessel diameter in the BRS group (2.92 ± 0.34 vs 2.50 ± 0.68; P < 0.001). Technical success was less likely to be achieved in the BRS group compared with the DES group (78.1% vs 96.3%, P = 0.012). Procedural success rates were 78.1% and 94.4% in the BRS and DES group, respectively (P = 0.035).

CONCLUSIONS:

Compared with second-generation DES for PCI of CTO lesions, BRS were associated with lower rates of technical and procedural success. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

bioresorbable scaffolds; chronic total occlusions

PMID:
26756959
DOI:
10.1002/ccd.26397
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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