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Pathog Dis. 2016 Apr;74(3). pii: ftw002. doi: 10.1093/femspd/ftw002. Epub 2016 Jan 10.

Interkingdom cooperation between Candida albicans, Streptococcus oralis and Actinomyces oris modulates early biofilm development on denture material.

Author information

1
Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Limeira Avenue, 901, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903, Brazil School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol BS1 2LY, UK.
2
School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol BS1 2LY, UK.
3
Department Physiological Sciences, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Avenida Limeira, 901, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903, Brazil.
4
School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol BS1 2LY, UK howard.jenkinson@bristol.ac.uk.
5
Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Limeira Avenue, 901, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903, Brazil.

Abstract

Candida-associated stomatitis affects up to 60% of denture wearers, and Candida albicans remains the most commonly isolated fungal species. The oral bacteria Actinomyces oris and Streptococcus oralis are abundant in early dental plaque. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of S. oralis and A. oris on the development of C. albicans biofilms on denture material. Resin discs were coated with saliva and at early (1.5 h) or later (24 h) stages of biofilm development, cell numbers of each species were determined. Spatial distribution of microorganisms was visualized by confocal scanning laser microscopy of biofilms labelled by differential fluorescence or by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Interkingdom interactions underpinning biofilm development were also evaluated planktonically utilizing fluorescence microscopy. Synergistic interactions between all three species occurred within biofilms and planktonically. Bacterial cells coaggregated with each other and adhered singly or in coaggregates to C. albicans hyphal filaments. Streptococcus oralis appeared to enhance hyphal filament production and C. albicans biovolume was increased 2-fold. Concomitantly, cell numbers of S. oralis and A. oris were enhanced by C. albicans. Thus, cooperative physical and metabolic processes occurring between these three microbial species intensify pathogenic plaque communities on denture surfaces.

KEYWORDS:

FISH; coaggregation; human oral cavity; microbial communities; stomatitis

PMID:
26755532
DOI:
10.1093/femspd/ftw002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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