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Acta Diabetol. 2016 Aug;53(4):535-41. doi: 10.1007/s00592-015-0832-y. Epub 2016 Jan 11.

Psychosocial factors not metabolic control impact the quality of life among patients with type 2 diabetes in China.

Zhu Y1,2,3, Fish AF4, Li F1,2, Liu L1,2, Lou Q5,6.

Author information

1
Affiliated Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China.
2
Jiangsu Province Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China.
3
Nursing College, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China.
4
College of Nursing, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Affiliated with the ISP Fellowship Support Program, St. Louis, MO, USA.
5
Affiliated Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China. lqq188@yahoo.com.
6
Jiangsu Province Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China. lqq188@yahoo.com.

Abstract

AIMS:

Quality of life is a major focus of health care today. In published studies on patients with type 2 diabetes, findings on quality of life are mixed. Those with diabetes have chronic illness and must adhere to a complicated care regimen daily, which for many patients is challenging. This study analyzed psychosocial factors and metabolic control as potential predictors of quality of life among these patients.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study of 397 patients with type 2 diabetes was conducted in a hospital in Nanjing, China. Demographic information and clinical characteristics were collected from the medical record. The World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF, General Self-Efficacy Scale, Diabetes Distress Scale, and Diabetes Empowerment Scale-Short Form were administered.

RESULTS:

The mean score of quality of life was 67.80 ± 13.44 on a 100-point scale. General self-efficacy (β = 0.340, P < 0.001), diabetes distress (β = -0.266, P < 0.001), and diabetes empowerment ability (β = 0.207, P < 0.001) were predictors of quality of life. In contrast, other factors including HbA1c, diabetes complications, and the duration of diabetes were not associated with quality of life (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study indicated that psychosocial factors such as self-efficacy, diabetes distress, and diabetes empowerment ability are related to quality of life. Assessment and interventions aimed at reducing psychosocial problems should be applied in diabetes care.

KEYWORDS:

China; Diabetes distress; Empowerment; Quality of life; Self-efficacy; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
26754324
DOI:
10.1007/s00592-015-0832-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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