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Expert Rev Pharmacoecon Outcomes Res. 2016 Dec;16(6):771-779. Epub 2016 Feb 26.

A cost-effectiveness model for the use of a cannabis-derived oromucosal spray for the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
a GfK , London , UK.
2
b Health Economics Outcomes Research , Bayer plc , Newbury , UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Severity of spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS) directly correlates with the level and cost of care required. This study assessed whether a tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol (THC/CBD) oromucosal spray for treatment of moderate-severe MS spasticity is a cost-effective use of healthcare resources in Wales.

METHODS:

A Markov model was developed to compare THC/CBD plus standard of care (SoC) treatments with SoC alone.

RESULTS:

At 30 years, total incremental cost for THC/CBD plus SoC treatment was estimated at £3,836/patient (ICER: £10,891/quality-adjusted life year [QALY]). Hospital admission costs had the greatest effect on the base case ICER. Inclusion of carer cost led to incremental cost of -£33,609/patient (ICER: -£95,423/QALY).

CONCLUSIONS:

The THC/CBD spray was found to be cost-effective for the treatment of spasticity in MS, and dominant, if home carer costs were included. Use of THC/CBD has the potential to generate cost savings by significantly improving the symptoms of moderate to severe MS spasticity.

KEYWORDS:

Multiple sclerosis; pharmacoeconomics; resource utilization; spasticity; tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol (THC/CBD) oromucosal spray; treatment costs

PMID:
26750641
DOI:
10.1586/14737167.2016.1140574
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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