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Mol Nutr Food Res. 2016 Apr;60(4):717-726. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201500781. Epub 2016 Feb 11.

Differential effects of Epigallocatechin-3-gallate containing supplements on correcting skeletal defects in a Down syndrome mouse model.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.
2
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering; Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.
4
Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

SCOPE:

Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21), is characterized by a spectrum of phenotypes including skeletal abnormalities. The Ts65Dn DS mouse model exhibits similar skeletal phenotypes as humans with DS. DYRK1A, a kinase encoded on Hsa21, has been linked to deficiencies in bone homeostasis in DS mice and individuals with DS. Treatment with Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a known inhibitor of Dyrk1a, improves some skeletal abnormalities associated with DS in mice. EGCG supplements are widely available but the effectiveness of different EGCG-containing supplements has not been well studied.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Six commercially available supplements containing EGCG were analyzed, and two of these supplements were compared with pure EGCG for their impact on skeletal deficits in a DS mouse model. The results demonstrate differential effects of commercial supplements on correcting skeletal abnormalities in Ts65Dn mice. Different EGCG-containing supplements display differences in degradation, polyphenol content, and effects on trisomic bone.

CONCLUSION:

This work suggests that the dose of EGCG and composition of EGCG-containing supplements may be important in correcting skeletal deficits associated with DS. Careful analyses of these parameters may lead to a better understanding of how to improve skeletal and other deficits that impair individuals with DS.

KEYWORDS:

Down syndrome; Epigallocatechin-3-gallate; Mouse model; Skeletal deficits; Supplements

PMID:
26748562
PMCID:
PMC4828301
DOI:
10.1002/mnfr.201500781
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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