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Med Mal Infect. 2016 Feb;46(1):4-9. doi: 10.1016/j.medmal.2015.11.013. Epub 2015 Dec 30.

Vaccine strategies against bacterial pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients.

Author information

1
Inserm U1173, UFR des sciences de la santé Simone-Veil, université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin, 78180 Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France. Electronic address: vincent.le-moigne@uvsq.fr.
2
Inserm U1173, UFR des sciences de la santé Simone-Veil, université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin, 78180 Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France; Service de microbiologie, groupe hospitalier et universitaire Paris Île-de-France Ouest, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 92033 Garches, France; Service de microbiologie, groupe hospitalier et universitaire Paris Île-de-France Ouest, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 92100 Boulogne-Billancourt, France.

Abstract

A large number of cystic fibrosis pathogens such as bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Mycobacterium abscessus are associated with complex therapeutic problems due to their inherent resistance to antibiotics. No vaccine is currently available against those pathogens. Vaccines are therefore crucial to combat these multidrug-resistant bacteria in specific clinical situations including cystic fibrosis. Various strategies may be considered to develop these vaccines. Similar virulence factors are expressed during the infection with various pathogens; they could thus be used as antigen to assess cross-protection. Many clinical trials are currently being conducted to try and develop a prophylactic treatment for patients presenting with cystic fibrosis.

KEYWORDS:

Burkholderia spp.; Cystic fibrosis; Mucoviscidose; Mycobacterium abscessus; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Vaccination

PMID:
26746326
DOI:
10.1016/j.medmal.2015.11.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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