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Fertil Steril. 2016 Feb;105(2):256-66. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2015.12.020. Epub 2015 Dec 30.

Experimental methods to preserve male fertility and treat male factor infertility.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and Magee-Womens Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
2
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and Magee-Womens Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: orwigke@upmc.edu.

Abstract

Infertility is a prevalent condition that has insidious impacts on the infertile individuals, their families, and society, which extend far beyond the inability to have a biological child. Lifestyle changes, fertility treatments, and assisted reproductive technology (ART) are available to help many infertile couples achieve their reproductive goals. All of these technologies require that the infertile individual is able to produce at least a small number of functional gametes (eggs or sperm). It is not possible for a person who does not produce gametes to have a biological child. This review focuses on the infertile man and describes several stem cell-based methods and gene therapy approaches that are in the research pipeline and may lead to new fertility treatment options for men with azoospermia.

KEYWORDS:

Fertility; azoospermia; culture; de novo testicular morphogenesis; gene therapy; grafting; infertility; stem cells; transplantation

PMID:
26746133
PMCID:
PMC4744139
DOI:
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2015.12.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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