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J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2016;38(2):217-26. doi: 10.1080/13803395.2015.1101054.

The impact of oculomotor functioning on neuropsychological performance in Huntington disease.

Author information

1
a Department of Psychology , Bridgewater State University , Bridgewater , MA , USA.
2
b Department of Psychiatry , Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa , Iowa City , IA , USA.
3
c Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health , University of Iowa , Iowa City , IA , USA.
4
d Department of Neurology , Vanderbilt University Medical Center , Nashville , TN , USA.
5
e Department of Neuropsychology , VA Maryland Healthcare System , Baltimore , MD , USA.
6
f Department of Psychology , University of Missouri-Kansas City , Kansas City , MO , USA.
7
g Department of Neurology , Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa , Iowa City , IA , USA.
8
h Department of Psychology , University of Iowa , Iowa City , IA , USA.

Abstract

Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative condition with prominent motor (including oculomotor), cognitive, and psychiatric effects. While neuropsychological deficits are present in HD, motor impairments may impact performance on neuropsychological measures, especially those requiring a speeded response, as has been demonstrated in multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia. The current study is the first to explore associations between oculomotor functions and neuropsychological performance in HD. Participants with impaired oculomotor functioning performed worse than those with normal oculomotor functioning on cognitive tasks requiring oculomotor involvement, particularly on psychomotor speed tasks, controlling for covariates. Consideration of oculomotor dysfunction on neuropsychological performance is critical, particularly for populations with motor deficits.

KEYWORDS:

Huntington disease; PREDICT-HD; neuropsychology; oculomotor functioning; processing speed

PMID:
26745770
DOI:
10.1080/13803395.2015.1101054
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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