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Ambio. 2016 Feb;45 Suppl 2:74-86. doi: 10.1007/s13280-015-0744-7.

Changing ideas in forestry: A comparison of concepts in Swedish and American forestry journals during the early twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Author information

1
Department of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. erland.marald@umu.se.
2
Great Lakes Research Center and Department of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, 49931, USA. nelangs3@mtu.edu.
3
Department of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. anna.stens@umu.se.
4
Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. jon.moen@umu.se.

Abstract

By combining digital humanities text-mining tools and a qualitative approach, we examine changing concepts in forestry journals in Sweden and the United States (US) in the early twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Our first hypothesis is that foresters at the beginning of the twentieth century were more concerned with production and less concerned with ecology than foresters at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Our second hypothesis is that US foresters in the early twentieth century were less concerned with local site conditions than Swedish foresters. We find that early foresters in both countries had broader-and often ecologically focused-concerns than hypothesized. Ecological concerns in the forestry literature have increased, but in the Nordic countries, production concerns have increased as well. In both regions and both time periods, timber management is closely connected to concerns about governance and state power, but the forms that governance takes have changed.

KEYWORDS:

Ecology; Forestry concepts; Governance; History; Sweden; The United States

PMID:
26744044
PMCID:
PMC4705075
DOI:
10.1007/s13280-015-0744-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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