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Nat Commun. 2016 Jan 8;7:10020. doi: 10.1038/ncomms10020.

Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of inhibitory synapses.

Author information

1
Institute of Clinical Neuroanatomy, Neuroscience Center, Goethe-University, Frankfurt/Main 60590, Germany.
2
Department of Neurology and Stroke and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tübingen 72076, Germany.
3
Center for Biomedical Imaging and Neuromodulation, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, New York 10962, USA.
4
Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, New York 10022, USA.
5
Division of Cell Biology, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Utrecht 3584 CH, The Netherlands.
6
Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Budapest H1083, Hungary.
7
Department of Neurophysiology, Medical Faculty, Ruhr-University, Bochum 44780, Germany.

Abstract

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used as a therapeutic tool in neurology and psychiatry. While repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) has been shown to induce plasticity of excitatory synapses, it is unclear whether rMS can also modify structural and functional properties of inhibitory inputs. Here we employed 10-Hz rMS of entorhinohippocampal slice cultures to study plasticity of inhibitory neurotransmission on CA1 pyramidal neurons. Our experiments reveal a rMS-induced reduction in GABAergic synaptic strength (2-4 h after stimulation), which is Ca(2+)-dependent and accompanied by the remodelling of postsynaptic gephyrin scaffolds. Furthermore, we present evidence that 10-Hz rMS predominantly acts on dendritic, but not somatic inhibition. Consistent with this finding, a reduction in clustered gephyrin is detected in CA1 stratum radiatum of rTMS-treated anaesthetized mice. These results disclose that rTMS induces coordinated Ca(2+)-dependent structural and functional changes of specific inhibitory postsynapses on principal neurons.

PMID:
26743822
PMCID:
PMC4729863
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms10020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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