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Ann Behav Med. 2016 Jun;50(3):337-47. doi: 10.1007/s12160-015-9759-3.

Dispositional Mindfulness Predicts Enhanced Smoking Cessation and Smoking Lapse Recovery.

Author information

1
Department of Psychological Science, Georgia College & State University, Milledgeville, GA, USA. whitney.heppner@gcsu.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC, USA.
3
Department of Psychological, Health, and Learning Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA.
4
School of Social Work, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.
5
Department of Biostatistics, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.
6
Department of Experimental Statistics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.
7
Stephenson Cancer Center and Department of Family & Preventive Medicine, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA.
8
Department of Health Disparities Research, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.
9
Department of Behavioral Science, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.
10
Department of Epidemiology, Rutgers School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ, USA.
11
Department of Psychology, Rice University, Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although mindfulness has been hypothesized to promote health behaviors, no research has examined how dispositional mindfulness might influence the process of smoking cessation.

PURPOSE:

The current study investigated dispositional mindfulness, smoking abstinence, and recovery from a lapse among African American smokers.

METHODS:

Participants were 399 African Americans seeking smoking cessation treatment (treatments did not include any components related to mindfulness). Dispositional mindfulness and other psychosocial measures were obtained pre-quit; smoking abstinence was assessed 3, 31 days, and 26 weeks post-quit.

RESULTS:

Individuals higher in dispositional mindfulness were more likely to quit smoking both initially and over time. Moreover, among individuals who had lapsed at day 3, those higher in mindfulness were more likely to recover abstinence by the later time points. The mindfulness-early abstinence association was mediated by lower negative affect, lower expectancies to regulate affect via smoking, and higher perceived social support.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results suggest that mindfulness might enhance smoking cessation among African American smokers by operating on mechanisms posited by prominent models of addiction.

KEYWORDS:

Mindfulness; Smoking cessation; Smoking lapse recovery

PMID:
26743533
PMCID:
PMC4867253
DOI:
10.1007/s12160-015-9759-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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