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Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 Aug;273(8):2091-5. doi: 10.1007/s00405-015-3879-z. Epub 2016 Jan 7.

Short-term effect of caffeine on olfactory function in hyposmic patients.

Author information

1
Smell and Taste Clinic, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Dresden Medical School, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307, Dresden, Germany.
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Erlangen Medical School, Erlangen, Germany.
3
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
4
Smell and Taste Clinic, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Dresden Medical School, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307, Dresden, Germany. thummel@mail.zih.tu-dresden.de.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of caffeine in patients with olfactory loss. The suggested mechanisms of action consist in the non-selective blocking of adenosine receptors as well as inhibition of the phospodiesterase. Olfactory function was tested twice in 76 hyposmic patients either because of URTI or because of sinunasal causes. For definition of hyposmia and for later assessment of phenyl ethyl alcohol odor threshold, and odor discrimination the Sniffin Sticks data test was used. Using a double-blinded design, the participants were divided into two groups: one received a cup of espresso with caffeine (65 mg/cup), the other a cup of espresso without caffeine (placebo). Before and approximately 45 min after espresso consumption olfactory function was assessed. Across all participants, in comparison to placebo there was no significant effect of caffeine on olfactory function, regardless whether it was caused by an acute infection of the upper respiratory tract or sinunasal disease. These results indicate that-under the current conditions-the phosphodiesterase-inhibitor/adenosine-receptor agonist caffeine has little or no short-term effect on olfactory function in patients with olfactory loss.

KEYWORDS:

Olfaction; Regeneration; Therapy

PMID:
26742907
DOI:
10.1007/s00405-015-3879-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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