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Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2016 Jan;155(2):345-54. doi: 10.1007/s10549-015-3671-1. Epub 2016 Jan 6.

Pre-diagnostic high-sensitive C-reactive protein and breast cancer risk, recurrence, and survival.

Author information

1
Department of Oncology, The Cancer Centre, Ullevål, Oslo University Hospital HF, 0424, Oslo, Norway. h.frydenberg@gmail.com.
2
Department of Oncology, The Cancer Centre, Ullevål, Oslo University Hospital HF, 0424, Oslo, Norway.
3
Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
4
Molecular Pathology Research Group, Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
5
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
6
Department of Oncology, University Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
7
Department of Microbiology and Infection Control, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
8
Department of Clinical Medicine, Centre for Cancer Biomarkers CCBIO, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
9
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

Inflammation may initiate and promote breast cancer development, and be associated with elevated circulating levels of inflammation markers. A total of eight 130 initially healthy women, participated in the population-based Tromsø study (1994-2008). Pre-diagnostic high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was assessed. During 14.6 years of follow-up, a total of 192 women developed invasive breast cancer. These cases were followed for additional 7.2 years. Detailed medical records were obtained. We observed an overall positive dose-response relationship between pre-diagnostic hs-CRP and breast cancer risk (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.06, 95 % CI 1.01-1.11). Postmenopausal women with above median levels of hs-CRP (>1.2 mg/l) had a 1.42 (95 % CI 1.01-2.00) higher breast cancer risk compared to postmenopausal women with hs-CRP below median. Postmenopausal women, who were hormone replacement therapy non-users, and were in the middle tertile (0.8-1.9 mg/l), or highest tertile of hs-CRP (>1.9 mg/l), had a 2.31 (95 % CI 1.31-4.03) and 2.08 (95 % CI 1.16-3.76) higher breast cancer risk, respectively, compared with women in the lowest tertile. For each unit increase in pre-diagnostic hs-CRP levels (mg/l), we observed an 18 % increase in disease-free interval (95 % CI 0.70-0.97), and a 22 % reduction in overall mortality (95 % CI 0.62-0.98). Our study supports a positive association between pre-diagnostic hs-CRP and breast cancer risk. In contrast, increased pre-diagnostic hs-CRP was associated with improved overall mortality, but our findings are based on a small sample size, and should be interpreted with caution.

KEYWORDS:

Breast cancer; CRP; Inflammation markers

PMID:
26740213
DOI:
10.1007/s10549-015-3671-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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