Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2016 Mar 15;310(6):R476-80. doi: 10.1152/ajpregu.00511.2015. Epub 2016 Jan 6.

Adropin acts in brain to inhibit water drinking: potential interaction with the orphan G protein-coupled receptor, GPR19.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
2
Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri samsonwk@slu.edu.

Abstract

Adropin, a recently described peptide hormone produced in the brain and liver, has been reported to have physiologically relevant actions on glucose homeostasis and lipogenesis, and to exert significant effect on endothelial function. We describe a central nervous system action of adropin to inhibit water drinking and identify a potential adropin receptor, the orphan G protein-coupled receptor, GPR19. Reduction in GPR19 mRNA levels in medial basal hypothalamus of male rats resulted in the loss of the inhibitory effect of adropin on water deprivation-induced thirst. The identification of a novel brain action of adropin and a candidate receptor for the peptide should extend and accelerate the study of the potential therapeutic value of adropin or its mimetics for the treatment of metabolic disorders.

KEYWORDS:

G protein-coupled receptor; adropin; hypothalamus; thirst

PMID:
26739651
PMCID:
PMC4867374
DOI:
10.1152/ajpregu.00511.2015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center