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J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2016 Apr;123(4):371-7. doi: 10.1007/s00702-015-1502-5. Epub 2016 Jan 6.

Serum uric acid is associated with apathy in early, drug-naïve Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (CEMAND), Department of Medicine and Surgery, Neuroscience Section, University of Salerno, Fisciano, 84131, Italy.
2
Neuropsychology Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy.
3
IDC Hermitage-Capodimonte, Naples, Italy.
4
Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Science and Odontostomatology, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
5
Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134, Verona, Italy.
6
University of Naples Parthenope, Naples, Italy.
7
Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (CEMAND), Department of Medicine and Surgery, Neuroscience Section, University of Salerno, Fisciano, 84131, Italy. mpellecchia@unisa.it.

Abstract

Both low serum uric acid (UA) levels and apathy are considered biomarkers of cognitive decline and dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD). There is an urgent need to combine different biomarkers to predict disease course in PD. Data on the relationship between serum UA levels and apathy in PD are lacking. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between serum UA levels and pure apathy in early, drug-naïve PD patients. Forty-nine early, drug-naïve PD patients were enrolled and stratified into two groups using the median serum UA levels at diagnosis (Group 1 serum UA ≤ 4.8 mg/dl; Group 2 serum UA > 4.8 mg/dl). The cohort was followed for the first 2 years of disease. Apathy was evaluated with the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES). Patients with lower serum UA levels presented significant higher AES score compared to patients with higher serum UA levels. Regression analysis showed that baseline serum UA levels were significant determinants of AES scores at both baseline and 2-year follow up, irrespective of gender, age, attention/executive functions and dopamine replacement therapy when applicable. This is the first study showing a link between serum UA levels and apathy in non-demented, non-depressed, early, drug-naïve PD, being lower serum UA levels associated with greater apathy. Further follow up of our patients and replication of this observation in independent cohorts are needed to establish if this combination of biomarkers may help in characterizing a subgroup of PD patients at diagnosis.

KEYWORDS:

Acid uric; Apathy; Biomarker; Cognition; Early Parkinson; Parkinson’s disease; Urate

PMID:
26739446
DOI:
10.1007/s00702-015-1502-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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