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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016 May;137(5):1406-12. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2015.10.032. Epub 2015 Dec 28.

Asthma as a risk factor for zoster in adults: A population-based case-control study.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn; Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn; Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
3
Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.
4
Department of Research, Olmsted Medical Center, Rochester, Minn.
5
Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.
6
Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn; Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn; Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Electronic address: juhn.young@mayo.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We recently reported an increased risk of herpes zoster (shingles or zoster) in children with asthma, but little is known about whether the same is true for adults with asthma.

OBJECTIVE:

We determined whether asthma is associated with an increased risk of zoster in adults.

METHODS:

This study was designed as a population-based case-control study. Zoster cases during the study period were identified among adults (aged ≥50 years) who resided in Olmsted County, Minnesota. We compared the frequency of asthma between zoster cases and birthday- and sex-matched control subjects (1:2 matching) without a history of zoster. Asthma status was ascertained based on predetermined criteria. A conditional logistic regression model was used to assess the association of asthma with risk of zoster.

RESULTS:

A total of 371 zoster cases and their 742 matched control subjects were enrolled. Of the 371 cases, 246 (66%) were female, 348 (94%) were white, and the mean ± SD age was 66.8 ± 10.7 years. Twenty-three percent (n = 87) of zoster cases had a history of asthma compared with 15% (n = 114) of control subjects. Controlling for pertinent covariates and confounders, there was a significant association between a history of asthma and risk of zoster (adjusted odds ratio, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.20-2.42; P = .003). The population attributable risk percentage for asthma was about 10%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Asthma is an unrecognized risk factor for zoster in adults. Consideration should be given to immunizing adults with asthma aged more than 50 years as a target group.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma; adults; epidemiology; herpes zoster; risk

PMID:
26739414
PMCID:
PMC4860069
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2015.10.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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