Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatrics. 2016 Feb;137(2):e20153279. doi: 10.1542/peds.2015-3279. Epub 2016 Jan 5.

Seasonal Effectiveness of Live Attenuated and Inactivated Influenza Vaccine.

Author information

1
Atlanta Research and Education Foundation, Inc, Atlanta, Georgia; Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; uwp0@cdc.gov.
2
Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia;
3
Baylor Scott and White Health, Texas A&M University Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, Texas;
4
Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington;
5
University of Michigan School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Ann Arbor, Michigan;
6
University of Pittsburgh Schools of Health Sciences and UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania;
7
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee;
8
Department of Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York; and.
9
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wisconsin.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Few observational studies have evaluated the relative effectiveness of live attenuated (LAIV) and inactivated (IIV) influenza vaccines against medically attended laboratory-confirmed influenza.

METHODS:

We analyzed US Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network data from participants aged 2 to 17 years during 4 seasons (2010-2011 through 2013-2014) to compare relative effectiveness of LAIV and IIV against influenza-associated illness. Vaccine receipt was confirmed via provider/electronic medical records or immunization registry. We calculated the ratio (odds) of influenza-positive to influenza-negative participants among those age-appropriately vaccinated with either LAIV or IIV for the corresponding season. We examined relative effectiveness of LAIV and IIV by using adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from logistic regression.

RESULTS:

Of 6819 participants aged 2 to 17 years, 2703 were age-appropriately vaccinated with LAIV (n = 637) or IIV (n = 2066). Odds of influenza were similar for LAIV and IIV recipients during 3 seasons (2010-2011 through 2012-2013). In 2013-2014, odds of influenza were significantly higher among LAIV recipients compared with IIV recipients 2 to 8 years old (OR 5.36; 95% CI, 2.37 to 12.13). Participants vaccinated with LAIV or IIV had similar odds of illness associated with influenza A/H3N2 or B. LAIV recipients had greater odds of illness due to influenza A/H1N1pdm09 in 2010-2011 and 2013-2014.

CONCLUSIONS:

We observed lower effectiveness of LAIV compared with IIV against influenza A/H1N1pdm09 but not A(H3N2) or B among children and adolescents, suggesting poor performance related to the LAIV A/H1N1pdm09 viral construct.

PMID:
26738884
PMCID:
PMC4732363
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2015-3279
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center