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Nature. 2016 Jan 7;529(7584):37-42. doi: 10.1038/nature16187.

Autophagy maintains stemness by preventing senescence.

Author information

1
Cell Biology Group, Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), CIBER on Neurodegenerative diseases (CIBERNED), E-08003 Barcelona, Spain.
2
Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Group, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute-CIBERNED, E-08035 Barcelona, Spain.
3
Chromatin and Disease Group, Cancer Epigenetics and Biology Programme (PEBC), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, E-08907 Barcelona, Spain.
4
Advanced Fluorescence Microscopy Unit, Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.
5
Department of Biomedical Science, University of Padova, 35100 Padova, Italy.
6
Telethon Institute of Genetics and Medicine (TIGEM), 80131 Napoli, Italy.
7
ICREA, E-08908 Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

During ageing, muscle stem-cell regenerative function declines. At advanced geriatric age, this decline is maximal owing to transition from a normal quiescence into an irreversible senescence state. How satellite cells maintain quiescence and avoid senescence until advanced age remains unknown. Here we report that basal autophagy is essential to maintain the stem-cell quiescent state in mice. Failure of autophagy in physiologically aged satellite cells or genetic impairment of autophagy in young cells causes entry into senescence by loss of proteostasis, increased mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, resulting in a decline in the function and number of satellite cells. Re-establishment of autophagy reverses senescence and restores regenerative functions in geriatric satellite cells. As autophagy also declines in human geriatric satellite cells, our findings reveal autophagy to be a decisive stem-cell-fate regulator, with implications for fostering muscle regeneration in sarcopenia.

PMID:
26738589
DOI:
10.1038/nature16187
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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