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Nat Immunol. 2016 Feb;17(2):204-13. doi: 10.1038/ni.3328. Epub 2016 Jan 4.

Adjuvanted influenza-H1N1 vaccination reveals lymphoid signatures of age-dependent early responses and of clinical adverse events.

Author information

1
Peter Gorer Department of Immunobiology, King's College London, London, UK.
2
ImmunoSurveillance Laboratory, Francis Crick Institute, Lincoln's Inn Laboratories, London, UK.
3
Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital and King's College London, London, UK.
4
Rheumatology and Translational Immunology Research Laboratories (LaRIT), Division of Rheumatology, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo/University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.
5
Momenta Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
6
Department of Genetics, King's College London, London, UK.
7
Department of Infectious Diseases, King's College London, London, UK.
8
Health Protection Agency, Porton Down, Salisbury, UK.
9
Academic Department of Rheumatology, Centre for Molecular and Cell Biology of Inflammation, King's College London, UK.

Abstract

Adjuvanted vaccines afford invaluable protection against disease, and the molecular and cellular changes they induce offer direct insight into human immunobiology. Here we show that within 24 h of receiving adjuvanted swine flu vaccine, healthy individuals made expansive, complex molecular and cellular responses that included overt lymphoid as well as myeloid contributions. Unexpectedly, this early response was subtly but significantly different in people older than ∼35 years. Wide-ranging adverse clinical events can seriously confound vaccine adoption, but whether there are immunological correlates of these is unknown. Here we identify a molecular signature of adverse events that was commonly associated with an existing B cell phenotype. Thus immunophenotypic variation among healthy humans may be manifest in complex pathophysiological responses.

PMID:
26726811
DOI:
10.1038/ni.3328
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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