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Am J Crit Care. 2016 Jan;25(1):52-8. doi: 10.4037/ajcc2016995.

Health-Related Quality of Life and Associated Factors in Intensive Care Unit Survivors 6 Months After Discharge.

Author information

1
Sharon McKinley is a nurse researcher in the intensive care unit at Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Mary Fien is a business analyst, eHealth NSW, Sydney, Australia. Rosalind Elliott and Doug Elliott are members of the faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia. sharonmckinley@optusnet.com.au.
2
Sharon McKinley is a nurse researcher in the intensive care unit at Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Mary Fien is a business analyst, eHealth NSW, Sydney, Australia. Rosalind Elliott and Doug Elliott are members of the faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Intensive care unit survivors often have diminished health-related quality of life.

OBJECTIVES:

To describe health-related quality of life of former intensive care patients and identify associated factors 6 months after hospital discharge.

METHODS:

Six months after discharge, 193 patients from an intensive care unit completed the Short Form-36 Health Survey; measures of sleep; Intensive Care Experience Questionnaire; Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales; and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist. Norm-based scores were calculated for the Short Form-36. Bivariate associations with Short Form-36 scores were tested by using the Pearson correlation. Multiple linear regression was used to identify independent associations with health-related quality of life.

RESULTS:

All scores on the Short Form-36 (physical component summary, 41.8; mental component summary, 48.2) were less than population norms. Bivariate associations with health-related quality of life (P < .05) were scores on the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, hospital length of stay, awareness of surroundings and frightening experiences, depression, anxiety, stress, posttraumatic symptoms, and sleep quality at 2 and 6 months. In linear regression, scores on the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, hospital length of stay, and sleep quality at 6 months were independently associated with Short Form-36 physical summary scores (P < .001); depression and stress were independently associated with mental summary scores (P < .001).

CONCLUSION:

Sleep, depression, and stress are potential targets for interventions to improve health-related quality of life and improve recovery.

Comment in

PMID:
26724295
DOI:
10.4037/ajcc2016995
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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