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J Am Heart Assoc. 2015 Dec 31;5(1). pii: e002621. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.115.002621.

Plasma Glycine and Risk of Acute Myocardial Infarction in Patients With Suspected Stable Angina Pectoris.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway (Y.D., G.T.S., E.R.P., P.M.U., O.K.N.).
2
Food Science and Human Nutrition Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (J.F.G.).
3
Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway (Y.D., G.T.S., E.R.P., P.M.U., O.K.N.) Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway (P.M.U.).
4
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway (G.S.T.) Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway (G.S.T.).
5
Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway (Y.D., G.T.S., E.R.P., P.M.U., O.K.N.) Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway (O.K.N.) KG Jebsen Center for Diabetes Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway (O.K.N.).

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Glycine is an amino acid involved in antioxidative reactions, purine synthesis, and collagen formation. Several studies demonstrate inverse associations of glycine with obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Recently, glycine-dependent reactions have also been linked to lipid metabolism and cholesterol transport. However, little evidence is available on the association between glycine and coronary heart disease. Therefore, we assessed the association between plasma glycine and acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

METHODS AND RESULTS:

A total of 4109 participants undergoing coronary angiography for suspected stable angina pectoris were studied. Cox regression was used to estimate the association between plasma glycine and AMI, obtained via linkage to the CVDNOR project. During a median follow-up of 7.4 years, 616 patients (15.0%) experienced an AMI. Plasma glycine was higher in women than in men and was associated with a more favorable baseline lipid profile and lower prevalence of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus (all P<0.001). After multivariate adjustment for traditional coronary heart disease risk factors, plasma glycine was inversely associated with risk of AMI (hazard ratio per SD: 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82-0.98; P=0.017). The inverse association was generally stronger in those with apolipoprotein B, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or apolipoprotein A-1 above the median (all Pinteraction≤0.037).

CONCLUSIONS:

Plasma glycine was inversely associated with risk of AMI in patients with suspected stable angina pectoris. The associations were stronger in patients with apolipoprotein B, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or apolipoprotein A-1 levels above the median. These results motivate further studies to elucidate the relationship between glycine and lipid metabolism, in particular in relation to cholesterol transport and atherosclerosis.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION:

URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00354081.

KEYWORDS:

amino acids; apolipoprotein; atherosclerosis; glycine; lipids and lipoprotein metabolism; myocardial infarction

PMID:
26722126
PMCID:
PMC4859380
DOI:
10.1161/JAHA.115.002621
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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