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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2016 Feb;25(2):366-73. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-1068. Epub 2015 Dec 31.

Family History of Cancer in Relation to Breast Cancer Subtypes in African American Women.

Author information

1
Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. tnb@bu.edu.
2
Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.
5
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.
6
University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii.
7
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
8
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The evidence on the relation of family history of cancers other than breast cancer to breast cancer risk is conflicting, and most studies have not assessed specific breast cancer subtypes.

METHODS:

We assessed the relation of first-degree family history of breast, prostate, lung, colorectal, ovarian, and cervical cancer and lymphoma or leukemia, to the risk of estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)), ER(-), and triple-negative breast cancer in data from the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI).

RESULTS:

There were 3,023 ER(+) and 1,497 ER(-) breast cancer cases (including 696 triple-negative cases) and 17,420 controls. First-degree family history of breast cancer was associated with increased risk of each subtype: OR = 1.76 (95% CI, 1.57-1.97) for ER(+), 1.67 (1.42-1.95) for ER(-), and 1.72 (1.38-2.13) for triple-negative breast cancer. Family history of cervical cancer was associated with increased risk of ER(-) (OR = 2.39; 95% CI, 1.36-4.20), but not ER(+) cancer. Family history of both breast and prostate cancer was associated with increased risk of ER(+) (3.40; 2.42-4.79) and ER(-) (2.09; 1.21-3.63) cancer, but family history of both breast and lung cancer was associated only with ER(-) cancer (2.11; 1.29-3.46).

CONCLUSIONS:

A family history of cancers other than breast may influence the risk of breast cancer, and associations may differ by subtype.

IMPACT:

Greater surveillance and counseling for additional screening may be warranted for women with a family history of cancer.

PMID:
26721669
PMCID:
PMC4767636
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-1068
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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