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PLoS One. 2015 Dec 30;10(12):e0144691. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0144691. eCollection 2015.

Hormonal Neuroendocrine and Vasoconstrictor Peptide Responses of Ball Game and Cyclic Sport Elite Athletes by Treadmill Test.

Author information

1
Department of Health Sciences and Sport Medicine, University of Physical Education, Budapest, Hungary.
2
Research Institute of Hungarian Armed Forces, Aeromedical Hospital, Kecskemét, Hungary.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our objective was to evaluate complex hormonal response in ball game and cyclic sport elite athletes through an incremental treadmill test, since, so far, variables in experimental procedures have often hampered comparisons of data.

METHODS:

We determined anthropometric data, heart rate, maximal oxygen uptake, workload, plasma levels of lactate, adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine, cortisol, angiontensinogen and endothelin in control (n = 6), soccer (n = 8), handball (n = 12), kayaking (n = 9) and triathlon (n = 9) groups based on a Bruce protocol through a maximal exercise type of spiroergometric test.

RESULTS:

We obtained significant increases for adrenaline, 2.9- and 3.9-fold by comparing the normalized means for soccer players and kayakers and soccer players and triathletes after/before test, respectively. For noradrenaline, we observed an even stronger, three-time significant difference between each type of ball game and cyclic sport activity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Exercise related adrenaline and noradrenaline changes were more pronounced than dopamine plasma level changes and revealed an opportunity to differentiate cyclic and ball game activities and control group upon these parameters. Normalization of concentration ratios of the monitored compounds by the corresponding maximal oxygen uptake reflected better the differences in the response level of adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine and cortisol.

PMID:
26717409
PMCID:
PMC4696681
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0144691
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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