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Nat Neurosci. 2016 Jan;19(1):20-7. doi: 10.1038/nn.4185.

The role of microglia and macrophages in glioma maintenance and progression.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosciences, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
2
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
3
Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

There is a growing recognition that gliomas are complex tumors composed of neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells, which each individually contribute to cancer formation, progression and response to treatment. The majority of the non-neoplastic cells are tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), either of peripheral origin or representing brain-intrinsic microglia, that create a supportive stroma for neoplastic cell expansion and invasion. TAMs are recruited to the glioma environment, have immune functions, and can release a wide array of growth factors and cytokines in response to those factors produced by cancer cells. In this manner, TAMs facilitate tumor proliferation, survival and migration. Through such iterative interactions, a unique tumor ecosystem is established, which offers new opportunities for therapeutic targeting.

PMID:
26713745
PMCID:
PMC4876023
DOI:
10.1038/nn.4185
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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