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N Am J Med Sci. 2015 Nov;7(11):509-16. doi: 10.4103/1947-2714.170611.

Caralluma Fimbriata Supplementation Improves the Appetite Behavior of Children and Adolescents with Prader-Willi Syndrome.

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1
Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Management, College of Health and Biomedicine, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) results from a deletion of the paternal genes in the region of chromosome 15q11-q13. PWS develops hyperphagia, which when left unmanaged, leads to an excessive ingestion of food. To date there is inadequate pharmacological treatment or supplementation for modification of the PWS hyperphagia and/or the associated behaviors. Therefore, the best practice is familial supervision and restriction of diet and environment.

AIM:

We aimed to determine if the natural supplement of Caralluma fimbriata extract (CFE) could attenuate hyperphagia or the associated appetite behaviors in children and adolescents with PWS over the 4-week pilot trial period.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We conducted a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized crossover trial over a 10-week period to investigate the effects of CFE on hunger control, in a cohort of children and adolescents with confirmed PWS (n =15, mean age 9.27 ± 3.16 years, body weight 43.98 ± 23.99 kg). Participants from Australia and New Zealand ingested CFE or a placebo of maltodextrin/cabbage leaf over a 4-week period, with a 2-week washout before the crossover to the other treatment. Weekly comparisons in appetite behavior, severity, and drive were recorded by parents, as scaled time-point measures on a hyperphagia questionnaire validated for PWS.

RESULTS:

CFE administration was found to induce a significant accumulative easing of hyperphagia (P = 0.05), with decreases evident in one-third of the participants. Furthermore due to CFE supplementation, a significant decrease (P ≤ 0.05) was recorded in the category of behavior and a decrease in hyperphagia (n = 8, P = 0.009) was observed at the highest dose 1,000 mg/day (recommended adult dose). There were no reported adverse effects at any dose.

CONCLUSION:

We demonstrate that an extract of the Indian cactus succulent Caralluma fimbriata eases hyperphagic appetite behavior within a cohort of children and adolescents (n = 15) with PWS without notable adverse effects. The outcomes of this study will have a potential positive impact on PWS management.

KEYWORDS:

Algorithm; emergency treatment; meta-analysis; reliability and validity; triage

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