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Neuroimage. 2016 Feb 15;127:324-332. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.12.028. Epub 2015 Dec 19.

The brain functional connectome is robustly altered by lack of sleep.

Author information

1
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: tobias.kaufmann@medisin.uio.no.
2
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
3
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway.
4
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
5
Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
6
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway.
7
Barnard College, Columbia University, NY, USA.
8
Department of Neurology and Brain Imaging Center, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt am Main, Germany; Department of Neurology, University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany.
9
The Intervention Centre, Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Norway.
10
Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Department of Research and Education, Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
11
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
12
FMRIB Centre, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, UK.
13
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway; The Intervention Centre, Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
14
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: l.t.westlye@psykologi.uio.no.

Abstract

Sleep is a universal phenomenon necessary for maintaining homeostasis and function across a range of organs. Lack of sleep has severe health-related consequences affecting whole-body functioning, yet no other organ is as severely affected as the brain. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying these deficits are poorly understood. Here, we characterize the dynamic changes in brain connectivity profiles inflicted by sleep deprivation and how they deviate from regular daily variability. To this end, we obtained functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 60 young, adult male participants, scanned in the morning and evening of the same day and again the following morning. 41 participants underwent total sleep deprivation before the third scan, whereas the remainder had another night of regular sleep. Sleep deprivation strongly altered the connectivity of several resting-state networks, including dorsal attention, default mode, and hippocampal networks. Multivariate classification based on connectivity profiles predicted deprivation state with high accuracy, corroborating the robustness of the findings on an individual level. Finally, correlation analysis suggested that morning-to-evening connectivity changes were reverted by sleep (control group)-a pattern which did not occur after deprivation. We conclude that both, a day of waking and a night of sleep deprivation dynamically alter the brain functional connectome.

KEYWORDS:

Circadian variability; Machine learning; Sleep deprivation; fMRI-based connectivity

PMID:
26712339
PMCID:
PMC6600874
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.12.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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