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Hum Gene Ther. 2016 Jan;27(1):19-31. doi: 10.1089/hum.2015.122.

Therapeutic rAAVrh10 Mediated SOD1 Silencing in Adult SOD1(G93A) Mice and Nonhuman Primates.

Author information

1
1 Gene Therapy Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School , Worcester, Massachusetts.
2
2 Department of Neurology, University of Massachusetts Medical School , Worcester, Massachusetts.
3
3 Vector Core, University of Massachusetts Medical School , Worcester, Massachusetts.
4
4 Department of Pediatrics, University of Massachusetts Medical School , Worcester, Massachusetts.

Abstract

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease; survival in ALS is typically 3-5 years. No treatment extends patient survival by more than three months. Approximately 20% of familial ALS and 1-3% of sporadic ALS patients carry a mutation in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). In a transgenic ALS mouse model expressing the mutant SOD1(G93A) protein, silencing the SOD1 gene prolongs survival. One study reports a therapeutic effect of silencing the SOD1 gene in systemically treated adult ALS mice; this was achieved with a short hairpin RNA, a silencing molecule that has raised multiple safety concerns, and recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) 9. We report here a silencing method based on an artificial microRNA termed miR-SOD1 systemically delivered using adeno-associated virus rAAVrh10, a serotype with a demonstrated safety profile in CNS clinical trials. Silencing of SOD1 in adult SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice with this construct profoundly delayed both disease onset and death in the SOD1(G93A) mice, and significantly preserved muscle strength and motor and respiratory functions. We also document that intrathecal delivery of the same rAAVrh10-miR-SOD1 in nonhuman primates significantly and safely silences SOD1 in lower motor neurons. This study supports the view that rAAVrh10-miR-SOD1 merits further development for the treatment of SOD1-linked ALS in humans.

PMID:
26710998
PMCID:
PMC4741242
DOI:
10.1089/hum.2015.122
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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