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Pediatrics. 2016 Jan;137(1). doi: 10.1542/peds.2015-2238. Epub 2015 Dec 23.

Kangaroo Mother Care and Neonatal Outcomes: A Meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Departments of Epidemiology, grace.chan@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
Departments of Global Health and Population, and.
3
Departments of Epidemiology, Departments of Global Health and Population, and Biostatistics, and.
4
Departments of Epidemiology, Departments of Global Health and Population, and Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts;
5
Departments of Epidemiology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts;
6
Departments of Epidemiology, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Pediatric Newborn Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts;
7
Departments of Epidemiology.
8
Save the Children, Washington, DC; and.
9
Departments of Global Health and Population, and Save the Children, Washington, DC; and Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Kangaroo mother care (KMC) is an intervention aimed at improving outcomes among preterm and low birth weight newborns.

OBJECTIVE:

Conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis estimating the association between KMC and neonatal outcomes.

DATA SOURCES:

PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, African Index Medicus (AIM), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Information System (LILACS), Index Medicus for the Eastern Mediterranean Region (IMEMR), Index Medicus for the South-East Asian Region (IMSEAR), and Western Pacific Region Index Medicus (WPRIM).

STUDY SELECTION:

We included randomized trials and observational studies through April 2014 examining the relationship between KMC and neonatal outcomes among infants of any birth weight or gestational age. Studies with <10 participants, lack of a comparison group without KMC, and those not reporting a quantitative association were excluded.

DATA EXTRACTION:

Two reviewers extracted data on study design, risk of bias, KMC intervention, neonatal outcomes, relative risk (RR) or mean difference measures.

RESULTS:

1035 studies were screened; 124 met inclusion criteria. Among LBW newborns, KMC compared to conventional care was associated with 36% lower mortality(RR 0.64; 95% [CI] 0.46, 0.89). KMC decreased risk of neonatal sepsis (RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.34, 0.83), hypothermia (RR 0.22; 95% CI 0.12, 0.41), hypoglycemia (RR 0.12; 95% CI 0.05, 0.32), and hospital readmission (RR 0.42; 95% CI 0.23, 0.76) and increased exclusive breastfeeding (RR 1.50; 95% CI 1.26, 1.78). Newborns receiving KMC had lower mean respiratory rate and pain measures, and higher oxygen saturation, temperature, and head circumference growth.

LIMITATIONS:

Lack of data on KMC limited the ability to assess dose-response.

CONCLUSIONS:

Interventions to scale up KMC implementation are warranted.

PMID:
26702029
PMCID:
PMC4702019
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2015-2238
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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