Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2016 Jul;27(7):2135-47. doi: 10.1681/ASN.2015050542. Epub 2015 Dec 23.

CKD Prevalence Varies across the European General Population.

Author information

1
European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry, Department of Medical Informatics, Amsterdam Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; k.brueck@amc.uva.nl.
2
European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry, Department of Medical Informatics, Amsterdam Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands;
3
Division of Nephrology and Dialysis, Columbus-Gemelli University Hospital, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy;
4
Department of Nephrology, St. Olav's Hospital/Faculty of Medicine, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway;
5
Department of Clinical Epidemiology research, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany;
6
Department of Medical Sciences/Molecular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden;
7
Finnish Medicines Agency, Department of Internal Medicine and Nephrology, Kuopio/National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland;
8
Department of Community Medicine, Primary Care and Emergency medicine, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland;
9
Department of Medicine, Setubal Hospital Centre, Setubal, Portugal;
10
Research Centre in Epidemiology and Population Health, INSERM Unit 1018, Villejuif, France;
11
Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center/Network Aging Research, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany;
12
Department of Pathophysiology, Medical Faculty/Department of Nephrology Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland;
13
Department of Nephrology, Levanger Hospital, Health Trust Nord-Trøndelag/The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway;
14
Department of Nephrology, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK;
15
Department of Nephrology, University Hospital of Orense, Orense, Spain;
16
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada;
17
Department of Cardiology, Toulouse University School of Medicine, Rangueil Hospital, Toulouse, France;
18
Department of Epidemiology of Cerebro and Cardiovascular Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy;
19
Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University College Cork & Mercy University Hospital, Cork, Ireland;
20
Unità Operativa di Cardiologia ed UTIC, Mercato S. Severino Hospital, Salerno, Italy;
21
Department of Nephrology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium;
22
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica, Clinical Epidemiology and Pathophysiology of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, Reggio Calabria, Italy;
23
Department of Nephrology/Graduate School of Medical Sciences and.
24
Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany;
25
Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and University College London, Centre for Nephrology, London, United Kingdom; and.
26
Department of Nephrology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.

Abstract

CKD prevalence estimation is central to CKD management and prevention planning at the population level. This study estimated CKD prevalence in the European adult general population and investigated international variation in CKD prevalence by age, sex, and presence of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. We collected data from 19 general-population studies from 13 European countries. CKD stages 1-5 was defined as eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), as calculated by the CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration equation, or albuminuria >30 mg/g, and CKD stages 3-5 was defined as eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) CKD prevalence was age- and sex-standardized to the population of the 27 Member States of the European Union (EU27). We found considerable differences in both CKD stages 1-5 and CKD stages 3-5 prevalence across European study populations. The adjusted CKD stages 1-5 prevalence varied between 3.31% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.30% to 3.33%) in Norway and 17.3% (95% CI, 16.5% to 18.1%) in northeast Germany. The adjusted CKD stages 3-5 prevalence varied between 1.0% (95% CI, 0.7% to 1.3%) in central Italy and 5.9% (95% CI, 5.2% to 6.6%) in northeast Germany. The variation in CKD prevalence stratified by diabetes, hypertension, and obesity status followed the same pattern as the overall prevalence. In conclusion, this large-scale attempt to carefully characterize CKD prevalence in Europe identified substantial variation in CKD prevalence that appears to be due to factors other than the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity.

KEYWORDS:

chronic kidney disease; clinical epidemiology; creatinine

Comment in

PMID:
26701975
PMCID:
PMC4926978
DOI:
10.1681/ASN.2015050542
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center