Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Thyroid. 2016 Feb;26(2):189-96. doi: 10.1089/thy.2015.0543. Epub 2016 Jan 25.

Ensuring Effective Prevention of Iodine Deficiency Disorders.

Author information

1
1 Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald , Greifswald, Germany .
2
2 Department of Endocrinology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Larrey , Toulouse, France .
3
3 Human Studies, National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research , Bergen, Norway .
4
4 Department of Endocrinology, Hospital das Forças Armadas , Lisbon, Portugal .
5
5 Disease Risk Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare , Helsinki, Finland .
6
6 Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Centre , Ljubljana, Slovenia .
7
7 Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National University Hospital , Reykjavik, Iceland .
8
8 Department of Endocrinology, Jagiellonian University Medical College , Krakow, Poland .
9
9 Faculty of Medicine, Sofia University Sv. Kliment Ohridski , Sofia, Bulgaria .
10
10 Centre for Regional Policy Research and Cooperation "Studiorum," Skopje, Macedonia .
11
11 University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, Department of Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Centre Sestre Milosrdnice , Zagreb, Croatia .
12
12 Departments of Endocrinology and Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University Hospital and Aalborg University , Aalborg, Denmark .
13
13 Institute of Molecular Medicine, Cardiff University , Cardiff, United Kingdom .
14
14 Department of Endocrinology, Institute University of Patras Medical School , Patras, Greece .
15
15 Nuclear Medicine Department, Erasme Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles , Brussels, Belgium .
16
16 Division of Endocrinology, University of Debrecen , Debrecen, Hungary .
17
17 Department of Internal Medicine, Rotterdam Thyroid Center , Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands .
18
18 Department of Internal Medicine, University of Latvia , Riga, Latvia .
19
19 Department of Endocrinology, Slovakian Medical University , Bratislava, Slovakia .
20
20 Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey , Guildford, United Kingdom .
21
21 Department of Public Health, Health Services Research and Health Technology Assessment, UMIT-University for Health Science , Medical Informatics and Technology, Hall, Austria .
22
22 National University of Ireland, Galway and Centre for Public Health, Queen's University , Belfast, North Ireland .
23
23 Research Centre for Prevention and Health , The Capital Region of Denmark, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Denmark .
24
24 Institute of Biochemistry, Food Science and Nutrition, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem , Jerusalem, Israel .
25
25 Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Hospital de Sant Joan Despi Moisès Broggi , Barcelona, Spain .
26
26 Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa , Pisa, Italy .
27
27 Institute of Endocrinology , Prague, Czech Republic .
28
28 Swiss Federal Institute of Technology , Zürich Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Zürich, Switzerland .

Erratum in

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Programs initiated to prevent iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) may not remain effective due to changes in government policies, commercial factors, and human behavior that may affect the efficacy of IDD prevention programs in unpredictable directions. Monitoring and outcome studies are needed to optimize the effectiveness of IDD prevention.

SUMMARY:

Although the need for monitoring is compelling, the current reality in Europe is less than optimal. Regular and systematic monitoring surveys have only been established in a few countries, and comparability across the studies is hampered by the lack of centralized standardization procedures. In addition, data on outcomes and the cost of achieving them are needed in order to provide evidence of the beneficial effects of IDD prevention in countries with mild iodine deficiency.

CONCLUSION:

Monitoring studies can be optimized by including centralized standardization procedures that improve the comparison between studies. No study of iodine consumption can replace the direct measurement of health outcomes and the evaluation of the costs and benefits of the program. It is particularly important that health economic evaluation should be conducted in mildly iodine-deficient areas and that it should include populations from regions with different environmental, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds.

PMID:
26700864
DOI:
10.1089/thy.2015.0543
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center