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ACS Nano. 2016 Jan 26;10(1):615-23. doi: 10.1021/acsnano.5b05647. Epub 2016 Jan 5.

Graphene-Based Interfaces Do Not Alter Target Nerve Cells.

Author information

1
International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA/ISAS) , Trieste 34136, Italy.
2
Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste , Trieste 34127, Italy.
3
Life Science Department, University of Trieste , Trieste 34127, Italy.
4
NanoInnovation Laboratory, ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Source , Trieste 34149, Italy.
5
Department of Organic Chemisty, University of Castilla-La Mancha , Ciudad Real 13071, Spain.
6
Cambridge Graphene Centre, University of Cambridge , Cambridge CB3 0FA, United Kingdom.
7
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Graphene Labs , Genova 16163, Italy.
8
Carbon Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, CIC biomaGUNE , Paseo de Miramón 182, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian, Spain.
9
Basque Foundation for Science, Ikerbasque , Bilbao 48013, Spain.

Abstract

Neural-interfaces rely on the ability of electrodes to transduce stimuli into electrical patterns delivered to the brain. In addition to sensitivity to the stimuli, stability in the operating conditions and efficient charge transfer to neurons, the electrodes should not alter the physiological properties of the target tissue. Graphene is emerging as a promising material for neuro-interfacing applications, given its outstanding physico-chemical properties. Here, we use graphene-based substrates (GBSs) to interface neuronal growth. We test our GBSs on brain cell cultures by measuring functional and synaptic integrity of the emerging neuronal networks. We show that GBSs are permissive interfaces, even when uncoated by cell adhesion layers, retaining unaltered neuronal signaling properties, thus being suitable for carbon-based neural prosthetic devices.

KEYWORDS:

graphene; hippocampal cultures; liquid phase exfoliation; neuronal interfaces; patch clamp; synaptic networks

PMID:
26700626
DOI:
10.1021/acsnano.5b05647
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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