Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2016 Apr;37(4):303-317. doi: 10.1016/j.tips.2015.11.011. Epub 2015 Dec 14.

Recent Advances in Adipose mTOR Signaling and Function: Therapeutic Prospects.

Author information

1
Institute of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Metabolic Syndrome Research Center, the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410011, China; Department of Pharmacology, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX, USA.
2
Departments of Cellular Structural Biology, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX, USA.
3
Institute of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Metabolic Syndrome Research Center, the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410011, China; Department of Pharmacology, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX, USA. Electronic address: LiuF@uthscsa.edu.

Abstract

The increasing epidemic of obesity and its comorbidities has spurred research interest in adipose biology and its regulatory functions. Recent studies have revealed that the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway has a critical role in the regulation of adipose tissue function, including adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, thermogenesis, and adipokine synthesis and/or secretion. Given the importance of mTOR signaling in controlling energy homeostasis, it is not unexpected that deregulated mTOR signaling is associated with obesity and related metabolic disorders. In this review, we highlight current advances in understanding the roles of the mTOR signaling pathway in adipose tissue. We also provide a more nuanced view of how the mTOR signaling pathway regulates adipose tissue biology and function. Finally, we describe approaches to modulate the activity and tissue-specific function of mTOR that may pave the way towards counteracting obesity and related metabolic diseases.

KEYWORDS:

adipogenesis; adipokine; lipid metabolism; the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR); thermogenesis

PMID:
26700098
PMCID:
PMC4811695
DOI:
10.1016/j.tips.2015.11.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center