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Virology. 2016 Feb;489:12-9. doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2015.11.009. Epub 2015 Dec 14.

Molecular characterization of a new monopartite dsRNA mycovirus from mycorrhizal Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and its detection in soil oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida).

Author information

1
Department of Plant Virology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic. Electronic address: petrzik@umbr.cas.cz.
2
Department of Plant Virology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic.
3
Institute of Soil Biology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Sádkách 7, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic.
4
Department of Plant Virology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic; Department of Genetics, Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice, Branišovská 31a, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic.

Abstract

A novel dsRNA virus was identified in the mycorrhizal fungus Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and sequenced. This virus, named Thelephora terrestris virus 1 (TtV1), contains two reading frames in different frames but with the possibility that ORF2 could be translated as a fusion polyprotein after ribosomal -1 frameshifting. Picornavirus 2A-like motif, nudix hydrolase, phytoreovirus S7, and RdRp domains were found in a unique arrangement on the polyprotein. A new genus named Phlegivirus and containing TtV1, PgLV1, RfV1 and LeV is therefore proposed. Twenty species of oribatid mites were identified in soil material in the vicinity of T. terrestris. TtV1 was detected in large amounts in Steganacarus (Tropacarus) carinatus (C.L. Koch, 1841) and in much smaller amounts in Nothrus silvestris (Nicolet). This is the first description of mycovirus presence in oribatid mites.

KEYWORDS:

Acari; Earthfan fungus; Mycovirus; Oribatida; Phlebiopsis gigantea large virus; Phlegivirus; Soil mites

PMID:
26700067
DOI:
10.1016/j.virol.2015.11.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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