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J Clin Microbiol. 2016 Mar;54(3):771-4. doi: 10.1128/JCM.02969-15. Epub 2015 Dec 23.

Urine Galactomannan-to-Creatinine Ratio for Detection of Invasive Aspergillosis in Patients with Hematological Malignancies.

Author information

1
Section of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
2
Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria martin.hoenigl@medunigraz.at reinhard.raggam@medunigraz.at.
3
Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
4
Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
5
Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics, and Documentation, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
6
Division of Pediatric Hemato-Oncology, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
7
Section of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, California, USA martin.hoenigl@medunigraz.at reinhard.raggam@medunigraz.at.

Abstract

Galactomannan (GM) testing of urine specimens may provide important advantages, compared to serum testing, such as easy noninvasive sample collection. We evaluated a total of 632 serial urine samples from 71 patients with underlying hematological malignancies and found that the urine GM/creatinine ratio, i.e., (urine GM level × 100)/urine creatinine level, which takes urine dilution into account, reliably detected invasive aspergillosis and may be a promising diagnostic tool for patients with hematological malignancies. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01576653.).

PMID:
26699701
PMCID:
PMC4767980
DOI:
10.1128/JCM.02969-15
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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