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Pediatr Diabetes. 2016 Dec;17(8):592-598. doi: 10.1111/pedi.12342. Epub 2015 Dec 23.

Low vitamin D level in pediatric patients with new onset type 1 diabetes is common, especially if in ketoacidosis.

Author information

1
Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Memphis, TN, USA.
2
University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Pediatrics Memphis, TN, USA.
3
University of California San Diego, Pediatrics San Diego, CA, USA.
4
University of California San Diego, Pediatrics San Diego, CA, USA. rnewfield@ucsd.edu.
5
Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, San Diego, CA, USA. rnewfield@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) adversely affects bone health. US data on prevalence of VDD or vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is lacking. Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) is speculated to increase the risk of developing T1D.

OBJECTIVES:

Assess the prevalence of pediatric VDD and VDI at diagnosis of T1D, and investigate correlations with demographic and clinical parameters.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved chart review of all T1D cases diagnosed from January 2011 to August 2012, all having the same 25OHD assay performed at Quest Diagnostics. Definitions for VDD, VDI, and vitamin D sufficiency (VDS) were 25OHD levels (ng/mL) ≤ 20, 21-29, and ≥ 30, respectively. We termed 25OHD <30 ng/mL as Low-D.

RESULTS:

We identified 185 autoantibody positive T1D subjects (51% female) with 25OHD measured, 51% Caucasian, 25% Hispanic, 4% mixed-Hispanic, 4% African American, and 16% other/mixed race. Mean age 9.8 yr (0.9-18.6). Most had Low-D (58%), 40% VDI, 18% VDD, and 42% VDS. No gender or age differences among the 25OHD groups. Low-D was more common (p < 0.0001) in Hispanics (81%) vs Caucasians (44%), but VDD rates were similar. Low-D subjects were heavier than VDS (p = 0.018). All four with elevated celiac titers were VDS. Diabetic ketoacidosis was present in 33%, but more common (44%) in Low-D vs. VDS (18%) (p < 0.0001), and trended higher in VDD (61%) vs. VDI (36%). Seventy-seven percentage with DKA had Low-D.

CONCLUSION:

VDD and insufficiency are common, even in Caucasians, at onset of T1D in pediatrics, worse in those with DKA.

KEYWORDS:

diabetic ketoacidosis; pediatric; type 1 diabetes; vitamin D deficiency

PMID:
26694737
DOI:
10.1111/pedi.12342
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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