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Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2015;24(4):650-8. doi: 10.6133/apjcn.2015.24.4.25.

Relationship between perinatal antioxidant vitamin and heavy metal levels and the growth and cognitive development of children at 5 years of age.

Author information

1
Children's Nutrition Research Center, Key Laboratory of Developmental Diseases in Childhood of Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Pediatrics in Chongqing, Chongqing International Science and Technology Cooperation Center for Children Development and Disorder, Chongqing, China.
2
Department of Children Health Care, Children's Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.
3
Children's Nutrition Research Center, Key Laboratory of Developmental Diseases in Childhood of Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Pediatrics in Chongqing, Chongqing International Science and Technology Cooperation Center for Children Development and Disorder, Chongqing, China. Email: tyli@vip.sina.com.

Abstract

in English, Chinese

To evaluate how prenatal exposure to antioxidant vitamins and heavy metals affects subsequent development. Maternal serum and cord serum levels of antioxidant vitamins (A, E, and C) were determined. Full-state, performance, and verbal intelligence quotients (FSIQ, PIQ, and VIQ, respectively) of 97 children were assessed at 5 years of age. The placental transport ratio (PTR: cord level relative to maternal serum level) of vitamin A (VA) was associated positively with FSIQ score (p=0.041), vitamin E (VE)-PTR was associated positively with PIQ (p=0.002) and FSIQ (p=0.025) scores, and cord serum cadmium (Cd) level was correlated negatively with VIQ score (p=0.025) at 5 years of age. High VE-PTR protected against low PIQ (OR=0.025; p=0.021) and FSIQ (OR<0.001; p=0.004). High maternal age was a protective factor against low VIQ (OR=0.661; 95% CI, 0.500- 0.875; p=0.004) and FSIQ (OR=0.700; 95% CI, 0.512-0.957; p=0.025). A higher maternal education (OR=0.038; 95% CI, 0.003-0.458; p=0.010) and economic level (OR=0.047; 95% CI, 0.004-0.579; p=0.017) were protective against a low FSIQ score. VA-PTR predicted physical growth. VA-PTR and VE-PTR predicted intelligence test performance at 5 years old. High Cd in cord blood may negatively affect subsequent intelligence.

PMID:
26693750
DOI:
10.6133/apjcn.2015.24.4.25
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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