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Acta Physiol Hung. 2015 Dec;102(4):380-90. doi: 10.1556/036.102.2015.4.5.

Preventive effects of garlic (Allium sativum) on oxidative stress and histopathology of cardiac tissue in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

Author information

1
Drug Applied Research Center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences , Tabriz , Iran.
2
Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences , Tabriz , Iran.
3
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences , Tehran , Iran.
4
Student of pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences , Tabriz , Iran.

Abstract

Since some complications of diabetes mellitus may be caused or exacerbated by an oxidative stress, the protective effects of garlic (Allium sativum) were investigated in the blood and heart of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Twenty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, garlic, diabetic, and diabetic+garlic. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg) in male rats. Rats were fed with raw fresh garlic homogenate (250 mg/kg) six days a week by gavage for a period of 6 weeks. At the end of the 6th week blood samples and heart tissues were collected and used for determination of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), malondialdehyde (MDA) and histological evaluation. Induction of diabetes increased MDA levels in blood and homogenates of heart. In diabetic rats treated with garlic, MDA levels decreased in blood and heart homogenates. Treatment of diabetic rats with garlic increased SOD, GPX and CAT in blood and heart homogenates. Histopathological finding of the myocardial tissue confirmed a protective role for garlic in diabetic rats. Thus, the present study reveals that garlic may effectively modulate antioxidants status in the blood and heart of streptozotocin induced-diabetic rats.

KEYWORDS:

blood; diabetes; garlic; heart; oxidative stress; rat

PMID:
26690030
DOI:
10.1556/036.102.2015.4.5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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