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Mol Ther. 2016 Apr;24(4):719-25. doi: 10.1038/mt.2015.224. Epub 2015 Dec 22.

Glycolate Oxidase Is a Safe and Efficient Target for Substrate Reduction Therapy in a Mouse Model of Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Centre for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Tenerife, Spain.
2
Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas de Canarias (CIBICAN), Universidad La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain.

Abstract

Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is caused by deficient alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, the human peroxisomal enzyme that detoxifies glyoxylate. Glycolate is one of the best-known substrates leading to glyoxylate production, via peroxisomal glycolate oxidase (GO). Using genetically modified mice, we herein report GO as a safe and efficient target for substrate reduction therapy (SRT) in PH1. We first generated a GO-deficient mouse (Hao1(-/-)) that presented high urine glycolate levels but no additional phenotype. Next, we produced double KO mice (Agxt1(-/-) Hao1(-/-)) that showed low levels of oxalate excretion compared with hyperoxaluric mice model (Agxt1(-/-)). Previous studies have identified some GO inhibitors, such as 4-carboxy-5-[(4-chlorophenyl)sulfanyl]-1,2,3-thiadiazole (CCPST). We herein report that CCPST inhibits GO in Agxt1(-/-) hepatocytes and significantly reduces their oxalate production, starting at 25 µM. We also tested the ability of orally administered CCPST to reduce oxalate excretion in Agxt1(-/-) mice, showing that 30-50% reduction in urine oxalate can be achieved. In summary, we present proof-of-concept evidence for SRT in PH1. These encouraging results should be followed by a medicinal chemistry programme that might yield more potent GO inhibitors and eventually could result in a pharmacological treatment for this rare and severe inborn error of metabolism.

PMID:
26689264
PMCID:
PMC4886931
DOI:
10.1038/mt.2015.224
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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