Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Elife. 2015 Dec 19;4. pii: e11946. doi: 10.7554/eLife.11946.

Neural evidence accumulation persists after choice to inform metacognitive judgments.

Author information

1
Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
2
Institute of Psychology, Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Abstract

The ability to revise one's certainty or confidence in a preceding choice is a critical feature of adaptive decision-making but the neural mechanisms underpinning this metacognitive process have yet to be characterized. In the present study, we demonstrate that the same build-to-threshold decision variable signal that triggers an initial choice continues to evolve after commitment, and determines the timing and accuracy of self-initiated error detection reports by selectively representing accumulated evidence that the preceding choice was incorrect. We also show that a peri-choice signal generated in medial frontal cortex provides a source of input to this post-decision accumulation process, indicating that metacognitive judgments are not solely based on the accumulation of feedforward sensory evidence. These findings impart novel insights into the generative mechanisms of metacognition.

KEYWORDS:

EEG; decision-making; diffusion model; error detection; human; metacognition; neuroscience

PMID:
26687008
PMCID:
PMC4749550
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.11946
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center