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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016 Mar;137(3):813-21.e7. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2015.09.052. Epub 2015 Dec 10.

Sensitization to cat and dog allergen molecules in childhood and prediction of symptoms of cat and dog allergy in adolescence: A BAMSE/MeDALL study.

Author information

1
Clinical Immunology and Allergy Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: anna.asarnoj@ki.se.
2
Clinical Immunology and Allergy Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Inflammatory Diseases, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Clinical Immunology and Allergy Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Division of Immunopathology, Department of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research, Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
5
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Sachs' Children's Hospital, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science and Education, Stockholm South General Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
7
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; IMIM (Hospital del Mar Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain; Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, Barcelona, Spain.
8
University Hospital of Montpellier, Hôpital Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier, Villejuif, France.
9
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Sachs' Children's Hospital, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sensitization to individual cat and dog allergen molecules can contribute differently to development of allergy to these animals.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to investigate the association between sensitization patterns to cat and dog allergen molecules during childhood and symptoms to these furry animals up to age 16 years.

METHODS:

Data from 779 randomly collected children from the Barn/Children Allergy/Asthma Milieu Stockholm Epidemiologic birth cohort at 4, 8, and 16 years were used. IgE levels to cat and dog were determined by using ImmunoCAP, and levels to allergen molecules were determined by using an allergen chip based on ISAC technology (Mechanisms for the Development of Allergy chip). Allergy was defined as reported rhinitis, conjunctivitis, or asthma at exposure to cat or dog.

RESULTS:

Cross-sectionally, IgE to Fel d 1 and cat extract had similar positive predictive values for cat allergy. IgE to Can f 1 showed a higher positive predictive value for dog allergy than dog extract IgE. Sensitizations to Fel d 1 and Can f 1 in childhood were significantly associated with symptoms to cat or dog at age 16 years. Polysensitization to 3 or more allergen molecules from cat or dog was a better longitudinal predictor of cat or dog symptoms than results of IgE tests with cat or dog allergen extract, respectively. Cross-sectionally, cat/dog-polysensitized children had higher IgE levels and more frequent symptoms to cat and dog than monosensitized children.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sensitization to Fel d 1 and Can f 1 in childhood and polysensitization to either cat or dog allergen molecules predict cat and dog allergy cross-sectionally and longitudinally significantly better than IgE to cat or dog extract.

KEYWORDS:

Allergy; Barn/Children Allergy/Asthma Milieu Stockholm Epidemiologic; Can f 1; Can f 5; Fel d 1; ISAC technology; IgE; allergen; birth cohort; cat; children; dog; microarray; pet; prediction; sensitization

PMID:
26686472
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2015.09.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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