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J Environ Manage. 2016 Feb 1;167:167-74. doi: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2015.11.048.

Phosphate adsorption from wastewater using zirconium (IV) hydroxide: Kinetics, thermodynamics and membrane filtration adsorption hybrid system studies.

Author information

1
Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007, Australia.
2
Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007, Australia. Electronic address: s.vigneswaran@uts.edu.au.

Abstract

Excessive phosphate in wastewater should be removed to control eutrophication of water bodies. The potential of employing amorphous zirconium (Zr) hydroxide to remove phosphate from synthetic wastewater was studied in batch adsorption experiments and in a submerged membrane filtration adsorption hybrid (MFAH) reactor. The adsorption data satisfactorily fitted to Langmuir, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order models. Langmuir adsorption maxima at 22 °C and pHs of 4.0, 7.1, and 10.0 were 30.40, 18.50, and 19.60 mg P/g, respectively. At pH 7.1 and temperatures of 40 °C and 60 °C, they were 43.80 and 54.60 mg P/g, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔG° and ΔS° were negative and ΔH° was positive. FTIR, zeta potential and competitive phosphate, sulphate and nitrate adsorption data showed that the mechanism of phosphate adsorption was inner-sphere complexation. In the submerged MFAH reactor experiment, when Zr hydroxide was added at doses of 1-5 g/L once only at the start of the experiment, the removal of phosphate from 3 L of wastewater containing 10 mg P/L declined after 5 h of operation. However, when Zr hydroxide was repeatedly added at 5 g/L dose every 24 h, satisfactory removal of phosphate was maintained for 3 days.

KEYWORDS:

Adsorption kinetics; Adsorption thermodynamics; Membrane filtration; Phosphate adsorption; Zirconium hydroxide

PMID:
26686069
DOI:
10.1016/j.jenvman.2015.11.048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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