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Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2016 Mar;22(3):549-56. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.11.1102. Epub 2015 Dec 11.

Developing a Risk Prediction Model for Long-Term Physical and Psychological Functioning after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Inholland University of Applied Sciences, Department of Health, Sports & Welfare/Cluster Nursing, Research Group Mental Health Nursing, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: a.braamse@vumc.nl.
2
Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
3
Department of Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Inholland University of Applied Sciences, Department of Health, Sports & Welfare/Cluster Nursing, Research Group Mental Health Nursing, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, The Hague, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is associated with impaired physical and psychological functioning for some long-term survivors. A risk prediction model would help clinicians estimate their patients' physical and psychological functioning after HCT and determine when to refer to added supportive care when appropriate. The purpose of the present study was to develop risk prediction models for physical and psychological functioning in HCT survivors. This was a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial (NCT00799461) that included 3- to 10-year HCT survivors. Risk predictions for physical and psychological functioning were developed by using backward logistic regression. The models were internally validated using bootstrapping techniques. Regression coefficients were converted into easy-to-use risk scores. Finally, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the total risk score were calculated. The analyses included 489 survivors, with a mean age of 45.6 (SD, 12.4) years; 47% were female and with a mean of 6.1 years (SD, 2.0) after transplantation. Younger age, higher body mass index (BMI), no or part-time work, more comorbid diseases, autologous transplantation, and chronic graft-versus-host disease predicted impaired physical functioning. Female gender, younger age, higher BMI, not living with a partner, autologous transplantation, and chronic graft-versus-host disease predicted impaired psychological functioning. Although both models had predictive value for long-term functioning, diagnostic accuracy was moderate. For the physical functioning receiver operating characteristic, area under the curve (AUC) after internal validation was .74 with sensitivity 51.9 and specificity 82.8 at the optimal cut-off. For psychological functioning, AUC after internal validation was .69 with sensitivity 83.3 and specificity 42.9 at the optimal cut-off. We conclude that it is possible to predict long-term physical and psychological functioning with readily accessible, mostly pretransplantation predictors. The accuracy of the risk prediction models can be improved for use in clinical practice, potentially by adding pretransplantation patient-reported functioning and comorbidities.

KEYWORDS:

Hematologic neoplasms; Hematopoietic cell transplantation; Quality of life

PMID:
26685773
PMCID:
PMC4753122
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.11.1102
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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