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PLoS One. 2015 Dec 17;10(12):e0144456. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0144456. eCollection 2015.

Genomic Ancestry, Self-Rated Health and Its Association with Mortality in an Admixed Population: 10 Year Follow-Up of the Bambui-Epigen (Brazil) Cohort Study of Ageing.

Author information

1
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto de Pesquisas Rene Rachou, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
2
University of California, Los Angeles, Fielding School of Public Health, Departments of Health Policy and Management and Community Health Sciences, Los Angeles, California, United States.
3
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Estatística, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
4
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Biologia Geral, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
5
Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Departamento de Medicina Social, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil.
6
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto de Pesquisas Gonçalo Muniz, Bahia, Salvador, Brasil.
7
Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto do Coração, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Self-rated health (SRH) has strong predictive value for mortality in different contexts and cultures, but there is inconsistent evidence on ethnoracial disparities in SRH in Latin America, possibly due to the complexity surrounding ethnoracial self-classification.

MATERIALS/METHODS:

We used 370,539 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) to examine the association between individual genomic proportions of African, European and Native American ancestry, and ethnoracial self-classification, with baseline and 10-year SRH trajectories in 1,311 community dwelling older Brazilians. We also examined whether genomic ancestry and ethnoracial self-classification affect the predictive value of SRH for subsequent mortality.

RESULTS:

European ancestry predominated among participants, followed by African and Native American (median = 84.0%, 9.6% and 5.3%, respectively); the prevalence of Non-White (Mixed and Black) was 39.8%. Persons at higher levels of African and Native American genomic ancestry, and those self-identified as Non-White, were more likely to report poor health than other groups, even after controlling for socioeconomic conditions and an array of self-reported and objective physical health measures. Increased risks for mortality associated with worse SRH trajectories were strong and remarkably similar (hazard ratio ~3) across all genomic ancestry and ethno-racial groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results demonstrated for the first time that higher levels of African and Native American genomic ancestry--and the inverse for European ancestry--were strongly correlated with worse SRH in a Latin American admixed population. Both genomic ancestry and ethnoracial self-classification did not modify the strong association between baseline SRH or SRH trajectory, and subsequent mortality.

PMID:
26680774
PMCID:
PMC4683049
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0144456
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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